Jared OLeary

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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 44 total)
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  • in reply to: Encouraging collaboration? #2554
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    I like that suggestion, Ashlee! In the classes I’ve facilitated, kids followed this generic pattern:

    1. Check the built-in help or resources
    2. Ask a friend for help
    3. Ask another friend for help
    4. If I’m not working with someone, ask me
      • If I’m working with someone, repeat steps 1-3
    in reply to: #50 Creating Rain with Code #2376
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Pamela, I think that would be an excellent way to connect science and CS if kids are already learning about the water cycle and want to simulate the cycle with code.

    in reply to: Science #2355
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Agreed, Cayme! I actually just uploaded a short project on simulating rain with ScratchJr, so it could definitely be done in Scratch.

    in reply to: #2 Interactive Collage #2293
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Mariah, did McKay share this project he created that’s based on the Harry Potter books?

    in reply to: #2 Interactive Collage #2292
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Josie, do you have the option to use headphones connected to their devices? If they’re sound isolating headphones, this could help out tremendously. Another option would be to hook up your devices to portable speakers or giant PA speakers (jk) so it’s easier to hear.

    in reply to: General Integration Ideas #2008
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    This website has some example integrated Scratch units/lessons that connect with a variety of disciplines and grade levels.

    in reply to: Unplugged activities? #2007
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster
    in reply to: Science #1931
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Here’s a link to a website with a couple of tutorials for middle school Scratch projects about cells in your body.

    in reply to: #4 Knock, Knock #1837
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous response:

    • I am adapting the Knock Knock joke lesson to be an assessment for internet safety. The students will take an internet safety rule and turn it into a conversation between two sprites.
    in reply to: Unplugged activities? #1833
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous responses:

    • I love unplugged activities because the physical aspect of following code helps students to understand what is really happening in the code, debug, and it drives home how the computer is obedient, however, cannot think on its own.
    • I love using unplugged activities as a starting point (or close to starting point) for coding. It’s a great way to show students the general idea behind coding and specific lines of code prior to getting into a program such as Scratch. My favorite one was with a Kinder group of kiddos where they were “coding” a dog (another student) to move to grab a bone and then to the dog house.
    • Response to above – I believe you’re talking about Rosie’s Runtime. I can see kindergartners loving this activity. It also has built-in adjustments so it adds more coding concepts to be appropriate and fun for older grades.
    • I like how unplugged activities require the kids to collaborate and communicate. We use a lot of these “problem solving or debugging” activities at the beginning of the year to help build our classroom culture, and set our norms for working in collaborative groups.
    • I have used unplugged activities when introducing a coding concept at the beginning of some lessons that relate to that online project given to students.
    • I think the unplugged activities give the students a very beginning way to understand coding.
    • I like unplugged activities because they help students connect with what they are doing on technology. Misconceptions can be addressed and it’s a great way to assess if students truly understand as they get started.
    • I would use the unplugged activities to jump start an understanding and a comfortableness to coding.
    in reply to: What does coding look like in your district? #1831
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous responses:

    • Till now I’ve been using code.or and ozobots. It will be interesting to start scratch.
    • Currently, we are just starting the coding program in our district. Kid’s don’t code unless it is “hour of code” or in an after school program. My goal this year is to have kid’s coding at least 30 minutes per week and also to begin integrating coding into content areas. I am an elementary classroom teacher, so integration into the other subject areas I teach will be very important. Since I haven’t ever taught coding before, I don’t have any logistical problems yet, but I imagine time will be an issue at first.
    • In the past, we have done “Hour of Code” and allowed kids to even code on a weekly basis, but we were relying on their own knowledge of this. Teachers hadn’t yet been given PD, so many of us didn’t know how to help kids in this arena. I’m excited to go back and teach this weekly (at the least) and feel more confident in my ability to direct kiddos.
    • Response to above – I love your “at the least” comment. I taught 6th grade, and if I could go back I would try to integrate coding in LOTS and LOTS of my school learning activities
    • In Kindergarten, we hope to use coding to practice letter identification. We will use a large rug on the floor, with grid lines and letters in each grid. We will take turns “coding” students to find a given letter, or code students to discover a mystery letter. After using our bodies to manipulate the letter grid, we can maneuver B-bots to code on a smaller paper with an alphabet grid.
    • Response to above – you can do this with BeeBots or Code and Go Mouse (same thing, but the mouse is cheaper). I’ve seen teachers do this and thought I got a video of it, but I didn’t so here’s an example I found on YouTube.
    • I would say that we are in the beginning stages of developing a coding program for our school district. Personally, I have not coded in my classroom. I am planning on using code in my room this coming school year. We don’t have a schedule at this time. Logistically, we obviously could use more time in our day to make code more accessible to our students.
    in reply to: Suggestions for reflecting and sharing #1828
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous responses:

    in reply to: Encouraging collaboration? #1824
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous responses:

    • Making sure coding is a partnered activity and having kids share their projects. Many coding activities could share or respond about personal things so you get to know each other better. For example each kid could create a biography about themselves.
    • If students have questions, they can ask 2 students before asking the teacher. You can collaborate with fellow teachers by planning the lesson and reflecting about how the lesson went.
    • There is such a push for 1:1 technology in the classroom, but I feel that our class collaboration can work really well when our kids share a screen. That way, they can problem solve together!
    • Response to above – That can be a great strategy for not only collaborating, but for providing extra assistance for kids who might initially struggle on their own.
    • Create task cards with different directions for coding with a partner.
    in reply to: Managing devices #1822
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous responses:

    • Set up expectations immediately and hold firm. Technology is an amazing tool, not a toy.
    • Set aside time to teach them properly how to navigate and use the technology properly.
    • Make sure everyone knows what device they are using, set up expectations and model and practice how to get them, put them away, charge, cleaning. We have ipad managers in 3rd grade that everyone will do throughout the year. Definitely agree it is a tool not a toy and make that clear. Charging station, numbered ipads with stickers.
    • setting aside time to introduce them to it and how to properly take care of device and rules for screen time
    • Discuss with your students the expectations you have for using the technology.
    in reply to: Classroom setup? #1818
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous responses:

    • Room setup video
    • I was the Science/STEAM Lab Outclass Teacher this past year and I had 6 lab tables with 4-5 students at each table. 3 tables on one side and 3 on the other side with an aisle down the middle so I could walk around. I had 25 iPads and had an Apple TV to mirror my teacher device to model as needed. Before I got the Apple TV, I would use the document camera to show my teacher device. Not great but worked. Sometimes I would have two classes at one time and 2 to 3 students would share an iPad and sit on the floor and some at tables. One of the activities I had 2nd Graders due, was have 2 sprites and use speech bubbles for vocabulary. Example One would say “What is Matter”? And the other sprite would say “Anything that takes up space and has mass”.
    in reply to: Growth mindset #1816
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous responses:

    • Many students come into our classrooms with a fixed mindset, meaning they more or less think that the knowledge they have is all that they will ever have. In order to change that mindset, it is important to save the early projects/work that the students do in your class so that later in the year you can have them compare what they can currently do to their earlier work. This, along with other growth mindset strategies, will help students to fully realize just how much their knowledge has grown.
    • Although I am new to coding, I saw how important having a growth mindset can be in coding. Some students are not used to having to work or fail before success. Coding will create opportunities for students to work through problems. Not only that but also realize there is more than one right way to solve a problem.
    • Response to above – I think it is super important for us to be the star example of demonstrating a growth mindset. Many of the teachers who are now being introduced to coding are in the “deer in the headlights” stage, and it is a perfect teaching opportunity for them to say to their students, “I am having to demonstrate a growth mindset by learning this now too!”
    • Response to above – I definitely agree! There were many complicated questions kids would ask about coding that I initially didn’t know right away; however, I made a point to let them know I didn’t know the answer right then and would come the following day explaining not only what the answer was, but how I found the answer (e.g., an external resource, looking at someone else’s code, online discussion forums, etc.).
    • Making sure kids are helping each other and that the best way to learn is threw trial and error. Each day share success and new things that were learned.
    in reply to: Assessing PBL? #1814
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous response:

    • Assessment resources
    • Just talking with Kindergarten students tells you a lot about their thinking as they process the project.
    • Maybe you could create a simple assessment for kindergarten students to use, such as an assessment where students could color a smiley face if they understood how to solve the problem and a sad face if they did not understand how to solve the problem. This way they could evaluate themselves.
    • Have students help to create the criteria for the rubric. GRASP model is helpful to address all components.
    • Encourage students to practice assessment of a project on a sample project. This gives them experience looking at a project from an outsiders view and, hopefully, they will transfer these skills to self-reflection.
    in reply to: If you knew then what you know now . . . #1812
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous response:

    • You don’t have to have all of the answers before you start.
    in reply to: 1A-AP-11 Decompose #1791
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous responses:

    • Following directions is a big part of Kindergarten. I like the reverse engineering concept where the students have to identify the directions/coding that was used.
    • I’m still working on this principle as I figure out coding myself 😉
    in reply to: 1A-AP-13 Attribution #1788
    Jared OLearyJared OLeary
    Keymaster

    Previous response:

    • When letting my students create and explore on Scratch Jr, it is so exciting to see them ask each other questions and comment that they learned something new from someone else. They then use “someone’s” idea to expand on their own ideas.
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 44 total)